Which businesses will be hit by a federal crackdown?

Breaking news: the number of people who die every year from broken glass has more than doubled in the past decade, according to a new study.

And it’s only getting worse, with more than 7,000 people dying every day from broken windows policing in Canada, the Globe and Mail has learned.

“We know that a lot of businesses are not doing enough to protect their employees from these types of attacks,” said Robyn Smith, vice-president of research at the University of Toronto’s Scarborough Centre for Urban Research.

The research, which was published in the Canadian Journal of Criminology, found that businesses that had at least one person who was injured while working at the business were twice as likely to be targeted as those that had none.

“This is not a new issue,” Smith said.

“It’s not something that we’ve been seeing as a result of a number of factors.

Broken windows policing is a relatively new tactic in Canada aimed at cracking down on businesses that are not following the rules in enforcing the occupancy and security rules in the workplace. “

But in the last few years, this is probably the highest number of attacks we’ve seen since 2003.”

Broken windows policing is a relatively new tactic in Canada aimed at cracking down on businesses that are not following the rules in enforcing the occupancy and security rules in the workplace.

In order to crack down on broken windows, police can request that businesses pay damages to those who were injured in an assault or who have been injured by an aggressive neighbour.

Smith said the government needs to take some action in the area of broken windows enforcement.

“When we do this, we have to address this issue of what’s the role of businesses in policing the occupancy, security and other things, because it’s really not the role that most businesses play,” she said.

The number of broken glass attacks in Canada rose from 9,924 in 2011 to more than 12,000 in 2016, according the latest data from Statistics Canada.

“Businesses need to step up, be proactive and protect their workers,” Smith told the Globe.

She also said it is important to have policies that encourage businesses to keep their doors and windows locked.

The Globe and Times requested the 2016 and 2017 data, which were released in March, but the government refused to provide the data.

A spokesperson for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said the department has a number to provide on broken window enforcement.

In a written statement to the Globe, Goodale wrote: “The minister recognizes that broken windows is a real problem and that it has caused harm to people in the community.

“In addition to this legislation, we are continuing to review the existing policies to ensure that they are being followed and enforced. “

“At the same time, we must ensure that our safety and the security of Canadians is paramount in our enforcement of these laws.””

At the same time, we must ensure that our safety and the security of Canadians is paramount in our enforcement of these laws.”